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You Can Buy An Authentic 1967 Eleanor Mustang From ‘Gone In 60 Seconds’

One of 11 models built for the film, this Eleanor Mustang was featured in numerous chase scenes.

The Eleanor Mustang from Gone in 60 Seconds is one of the most iconic movie cars ever created. While it has spawned countless replicas, a rare authentic model from the 2000 film is going up for auction.

Set to go under the hammer at Mecum’s Kissimmee auction in January, the car was created by Cinema Vehicle Services and is one of 11 cars built for the Nicolas Cage-led movie.

According to Mecum, this particular model is the so-called “Dream Car” and was used for a number of interior and exterior sequences. It played a prominent role in the film and was used in “chase scenes through the shipyard, city and along the Los Angeles River.”

Related: One of the Original Eleanor Mustangs from Gone in 60 Seconds Hits the Auction Block

While the car is widely known, its history is still interesting nonetheless. The original sketches were created by Steve Stanford and the design was fined tuned by Chip Foose.

Once the design was completed, Cinema Vehicle Services got to work starting with a 1967 Ford Mustang. The car was given a GT500-inspired makeover and equipped with custom wheels, auxiliary lights and a Pepper Gray Metallic paint job.

The interior was also updated as the model was outfitted with a wood-rimmed steering wheel, aluminum pedals and a Hurst shifter with a “Go Baby Go” button. The car also has low back seats, a nitrous switch and an Auto Meter tachometer.

On the mechanical side, there’s a 5.8-liter (351 cubic inch) V8 engine that features aluminum heads, a roller camshaft and an Edelbrock Performer intake manifold. The model also has a stainless steel side-exiting exhaust, Magnaflow mufflers and an MSD ignition system.

The engine is connected to a five-speed manual transmission which features a Quicktime bellhousing. It sends power to a Wenco driveshaft that transfers it to a Positraction rear differential.

Other highlights include a Total Control Products suspension, Wilwood disc brakes and a power steering system. The nitrous system is also real and it delivers an extra 100 hp (75 kW / 101 PS) to 125 hp (93 kW / 127 PS).

The car looks brand new and that’s because the model was recently given a “full rotisserie restoration” by Cinema Vehicle Services. There’s no word on an auction estimate, but Mecum said the car has only been driven approximately 90 miles (145 km) since the restoration was completed.

 

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